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meista

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  1. Check OwnedCore. Also, many good bots are private, or really expensive.
  2. Nobody knows the degree of severity except SC. Nobody knows how much data they collect, or when the next ban wave will be. The general consensus is to bot with caution (i.e.: ensure you are botting as "humanly" as possible) or not at all. There will always be a risk when you bot.
  3. I don't think "tagging" an account as suspicious costs much, if anything at all. The only real cost is the computational power required to run the script that detects and tags bots, which is next to nothing for SC. This ban wave is not just "a couple of accounts", and even if it were, it could be that SC is using this banwave as a warning to all botters to stop, and subsequent ban waves may be even bigger.
  4. Although the ban wave is over, SC might still collecting data and "tagging" botting/botted accounts, to ban in the next wave. Just in case anyone might read this and think that it is safe to bot again. Botting is never safe.
  5. I think this belongs in the German section.
  6. This is mostly true. SC could write detection scripts, that only start collecting data once a bot detection is triggered. This would save on a ton of data storage, since they'd only collect data on (potential) bots. Further, I wouldn't be surprised if SC employed some sort of machine learning algorithm to detect bots/separate human and non-human behaviour.
  7. It's more likely that bans are hardware ID related, more than IP address related.
  8. I find it hilarious that you want to boycott a game because they banned you for violating their ToS. It's akin to saying you hate the police because they arrested you for murder.
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